Archive for the ‘Harlan’ Category

I recently posted about the “New Brandeis Movement,” a collective of economists and antitrust lawyers who are arguing for a return to the idea that the dangers of trusts and monopolies was more than just a rise in consumer prices. If that movement can be said to have a manifesto, it would have to be […]


This is a semi-sequel to an earlier post that was written in response to the publication of Clare Cushman’s Table For 9: Supreme Court Food Traditions & Recipes. I probably should have put more thought in the title, because while this post does talk about food and recipes, it doesn’t really talk about eating habits […]


While going through the John Marshall Harlan papers here at the University of Louisville, I stumbled across a typewritten transcript of an old Kentucky newspaper article describing a debate between Harlan and William Elliott Simms as they competed for the Congressional seat for the Ashland district in Kentucky. Harlan described his campaign against Simms in […]


The Louis D. Brandeis School of Law at the University of Louisville had a big week last month. Every year or so, the law school awards the Brandeis Medal to individuals whose lives and work demonstrate a commitment to “the ideals of individual liberty, concern for the disadvantaged and public service.” This year’s recipient was […]


I have just discovered a rash of Louis D. Brandeis and John Marshall Harlan related articles. Here is a quick run down of them. Mel Urofsky has penned an article related to the upcoming nomination of a successor to Justice Scalia that has been reprinted in a number of newspaper. He argues that Brandeis was […]


Melvin Urofsky, author of Louis D. Brandeis: A Life and many other books and articles about Brandeis, has just published a new book. Titled Dissent and the Supreme Court, it is a look at how Supreme Court dissents helped form a dialogue throughout history that shaped how the Constitution is interpreted. I haven’t had a […]


The story of John Marshall Harlan and African-Americans is complicated but has traditionally followed a set path. He was a slave owner who fought for the Union during the Civil War. After the war, he campaigned against the Reconstruction amendments. Then he joined the Republican Party and once appointed onto¬†the Supreme Court and became¬†one of […]