Archive for the ‘Harlan’ Category

This is a semi-sequel to an earlier post that was written in response to the publication of Clare Cushman’s Table For 9: Supreme Court Food Traditions & Recipes. I probably should have put more thought in the title, because while this post does talk about food and recipes, it doesn’t really talk about eating habits […]


While going through the John Marshall Harlan papers here at the University of Louisville, I stumbled across a typewritten transcript of an old Kentucky newspaper article describing a debate between Harlan and William Elliott Simms as they competed for the Congressional seat for the Ashland district in Kentucky. Harlan described his campaign against Simms in […]


The Louis D. Brandeis School of Law at the University of Louisville had a big week last month. Every year or so, the law school awards the Brandeis Medal to individuals whose lives and work demonstrate a commitment to “the ideals of individual liberty, concern for the disadvantaged and public service.” This year’s recipient was […]


I have just discovered a rash of Louis D. Brandeis and John Marshall Harlan related articles. Here is a quick run down of them. Mel Urofsky has penned an article related to the upcoming nomination of a successor to Justice Scalia that has been reprinted in a number of newspaper. He argues that Brandeis was […]


Melvin Urofsky, author of Louis D. Brandeis: A Life and many other books and articles about Brandeis, has just published a new book. Titled Dissent and the Supreme Court, it is a look at how Supreme Court dissents helped form a dialogue throughout history that shaped how the Constitution is interpreted. I haven’t had a […]


The story of John Marshall Harlan and African-Americans is complicated but has traditionally followed a set path. He was a slave owner who fought for the Union during the Civil War. After the war, he campaigned against the Reconstruction amendments. Then he joined the Republican Party and once appointed onto the Supreme Court and became one of […]


The Journal of Supreme Court History can usually be counted to offer some new information on John Marshall Harlan and Louis D. Brandeis, and their latest issue (volume 39, number 1) does not disappoint in that regard.  The first article in the issue is titled “Plessy v. Ferguson: the Effects of Lawyering on a Challenge […]