Archive for the ‘brandeis’ Category

On February 2, 1893, Louis D. Brandeis wrote a letter to William Harrison Dunbar, a young man who had been practicing law in Brandeis’s firm for over five years. Dunbar was a bright man who showed a lot of promise, yet Brandeis apparently felt that his career was not advancing the way it should. In […]


This is a semi-sequel to an earlier post that was written in response to the publication of Clare Cushman’s Table For 9: Supreme Court Food Traditions & Recipes. I probably should have put more thought in the title, because while this post does talk about food and recipes, it doesn’t really talk about eating habits […]


Everyone at my library is excited because we just received our copy of Table For 9: Supreme Court Food Traditions & Recipes by Clare Cushman, editor of The Journal of Supreme Court History. It’s a really nice looking book, with lots of photos, recipes and tidbits about the eating habits of the justices, both present […]


If Brandeis had been “just” a lawyer, or had become an academic like many of his family members wanted, he probably would not be remembered today. But in addition to everything else, Brandeis was a great writer, and his activism and his seat on the Supreme Court gave him a platform to disseminate his philosophy. […]


We haven’t received the Summer 2017 issue of The Green Bag yet here at the Law Library, but it has appeared online, which these days may be the only edition that matters. I’m being stubborn and waiting for my paper copy so I haven’t read the entire thing, but there are two articles I wanted […]


Contrary to popular belief, the Louis D. Brandeis School of Law is located at the University of Louisville, in Kentucky, and not at Brandeis University. Brandeis was born in Louisville in 1856, and while he never lived there again after he graduated from Harvard Law School, he retained a fondness for his hometown for the […]


There have been many summations of Brandeis’s philosophy over the years, but there is always room for new looks at his life’s work. The latest overview is an article by Joel K. Goldstein and Charles A. Miller called “Brandeis: The Legacy of a Justice” (100 Marquette Law Review 461-495). Their article actually comes out of […]